Volunteering

Volunteering (5)

Wednesday, 05 August 2015 13:44

Volunteer Newsletters Archive

Riverside 2015

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-08 August 3.87 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-07 July 1.26 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-06 June 1.42 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-05 May 1.4 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-04 April 1.65 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-03 March 2.13 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-02 February 5.61 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-01 January 5.25 MB

Riverside 2014

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-12 December 5.43 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-11 November 7.27 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-10 October 6.65 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-09 September 3.33 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-08 August 2.8 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-07 July 3.72 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-06 June 7.8 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-05 May 2.3 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-04 April 3.6 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-03 March 2.78 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-02 February 3.61 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2014-01 January 1.72 MB

Riverside 2013

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-12 December 878.25 KB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-11 November 3.46 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-10 October 4.7 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-09 September 3.53 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-08 August 1.21 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-07 - July 6.24 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-06 - June 4.24 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-05 - May 2.89 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-04 - April 1.84 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-03 - March 2.53 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-02 - February 1.48 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2013-01 - January 2.14 MB

Riverside 2012

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-12 - December 2.79 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-11 - November 1.83 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-10 - October 5.25 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-09 - September 7.74 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-08 - August 2.24 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-07 - July 5.35 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-06 - June 2.17 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-05 - May 4.16 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-04 - April 4.73 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-03 - March 2.01 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-02 - February 3.19 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-01 - January 3.99 MB

Riverside 2011

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-12 - December 2011 3.13 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-11 - November 2011 3.51 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-10 - October 2011 1.12 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-09 - September 2011 771.83 KB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-08 - August 2011 7.07 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-07 - July 2011 9.82 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-06 - June 2011 6.42 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-05 - May 2011 8.96 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-04 - April 2011 15.27 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-03 - March 2011 2.09 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-02 - February 2011 1.04 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-01 - January 2011 3.07 MB

Riverside 2010

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file The Volunteer Voice | Vol. 1 - Issue 7 - December 2010 10.57 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file The Volunteer Voice | Vol. 1 - Issue 6 - November 2010 3.15 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file The Volunteer Voice | Vol. 1 - Issue 5 - October 2010 3.83 MB

 

Desert 2012

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-12 - December 3.06 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-10 - October 3.12 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-01 - January 1.61 MB

Desert 2011

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-12 - December 2011 1.57 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-11 - November 2011 2.26 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2011-10 - October 2011 1 MB

 

San Jacinto Valley Animal Campus 2015

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 4th Quarter - Volunteer Voices 4.13 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 3rd Quarter - Volunteer Voices 1.68 MB

Tuesday, 18 February 2014 06:20

Alana Joy Kerr

March 24, 1995 to February 8, 2011

 

The Press-Enterprise touched on the tragic death of Alana, a sweet volunteer who donated her time at the Western Riverside County/City Animal Shelter.

Here is an excerpt from the article that was Published: 2/9/2011 06:21 PM.

Alana, 15, a sophomore at Norte Vista High School, was killed on her way home when she was struck by a train at the Buchanan Street crossing in far west Riverside, only yards from where she lived in a mobile home park.

Alana attended Norte Vista's International Baccalaureate program, which offers a more challenging curriculum for college-bound students. She took a city bus to and from the school and was walking home from a bus stop when she died.

Alana had thought about becoming a veterinarian but lately had gravitated toward studying criminology to work in forensics, possibly as a coroner, her parents said.

alana joy kerr lrgAlana volunteered at the shelter and usually spent about 18 hours a month here, playing with cats to make them more sociable and thus, more adoptable, as well as grooming the adorable puppies.  She was well known and all the other volunteers loved her.

On Saturday, February 12th, 2011, employees for the Department of Animal Services and volunteers gathered together to create a memorial butterfly garden where Alana could be remembered forever.

Her mother, Jennifer, and father, David, and more than a dozen members of her extended family and several of her very close friends, celebrated the memorial garden.

When all members of the family arrived, we went on a short tour of the shelter.  It really gave the family a sense of satisfaction seeing how important volunteering is — and how important it was to the caring Alana.

The family and friends played with the cats, which Alana loved doing.

Once our tour concluded, our last stop was the tree ceremony. The tree was a donation, courtesy of efforts made by Fred Mallard Jr., one of our adult volunteers.

Alana’s parents, family members and friends and all of the volunteers grabbed a handful of soil and placed it around the Night Shade Tree. Each and everyone at the shelter that morning were able to physically say goodbye to this wonderful soul.

Like many of our volunteers, Alana dedicated her time to the hundreds of homeless pets that need so much love. Alana, indeed, gave them love and helped these voiceless creatures become more adoptable. She gave them a better chance at a lifelong, loving home. For brief moments in these animals’ lives, they knew what it would feel like to receive kindness.

When the last handfuls of soil were placed underneath the tree, giving it a solid, firm foundation, Alana’s mother and father and younger brother, Colin, took turns watering the tree.

They gave the thirsty tree a good start at life.

Everyone at the shelter will miss this joyful young lady. Her pleasant demeanor and kindness to the voiceless pets of society will remain forever an inspiration to all of us.

Thank you to Death Row Dogs and the “Catching the Future” fashion show participants and attendees for sponsoring the butterfly garden.

Monday, 17 February 2014 20:11

R.E.A.R.S.

Riverside Emergency Animal Rescue System (R.E.A.R.S.)

(951) 358-7387

  • REARS Academy - Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016 at the Western Riverside County/City Animal Shelter, 6851 Van Buren Blvd., Jurupa Valley, Calif. 92504
    Interested volunteers should e-mail Commander Rita Gutierrez at RDGutier@rcdas.org

  • REARS members: Please note that a REARS re-certification days are TBA.
    Location TBD

R.E.A.R.S. is a non-profit organization that relies primarily on donations and proceeds from fundraisers to purchase equipment to provide for the safety of our volunteers. Anyone interested in making a donation to R.E.A.R.S. is encouraged to contact Riverside County Department of Animal Services at the number or email listed below.

ABOUT R.E.A.R.S.

REARSWhat

REARS is the system that has been developed to perform animal rescue, evacuation, sheltering, care and welfare of domestic and livestock animals within Riverside County during times of disaster or extraordinary emergencies.

Who

REARS is comprised of a coordinating council consisting of the Riverside County Animal Services, Riverside County Sheriff’s Department, Riverside County Fire Department – Office of Emergency Services and the California Highway Patrol. These are the primary agencies in supporting an evacuation.

The REARS backbone for carrying out the operational tasks of rescuing, evacuating, sheltering and caring for animals during emergencies is local government animal welfare staff  and volunteers trained in animal rescue and emergency animal care. This cadre of trained individuals is supervised on incidents by Riverside County Animal Services management staff.

Where

REARS can be deployed anywhere within the County of Riverside for emergency activities. Local government can also request REARS through the normal call out procedure.  Through the Operational Area Coordinator, RivCo Fire Department – Office of Emergency Services, REARS may also be deployed out of County.

How

REARS is activated through a pager or a telephone call out procedure. (see activation procedures) RivCo Animal Services will always be the lead for REARS, though may be assisted on scene by another coordinating council agency such as RivCo Sheriff, RivCo Fire Department – OES or CHP.

RivCo Animal Services Supervision (Animal Rescue Coordinator) will be collocated at the Incident Command Post while another representative establishes an Animal Staging Area (Animal Staging Manager) nearby.  This staging area will be in close proximity to the ICP, though not close enough to interfere with ICP or operational activities. The nature of the size and quantity of animal rescue equipment and vehicles necessitates an Animal Staging Area, separate from the Incident Staging Area. This will be the area that equipment is checked in, configured in teams and then deployed to perform animal rescue activities.

Rescued animals are brought to Animal Staging for inventory, tagging, and emergency first aid and then transported to board facilities by transport teams.

Why

Riverside County Animal Services is the tasked agency within the County for the rescue, care and welfare of animals. During times of disasters, they have called upon the services of other local government animal services agencies to assist. It was quickly realized that extraordinary emergencies can overwhelm the available on duty animal rescue agencies and extended response times will affect the overall success of rescue operations. Additionally, there was often an overwhelming response of good intentioned local citizens desiring to assist. This has helped in the past, though often hindered emergency operations and needlessly placed citizen rescuers and first responders in harm’s way.

The Mountain Fire of October 2003 was the catalyst to developing a coordinated and collaborative effort for the emergency rescue, care and welfare of animals during times of emergencies and disasters.

HISTORY

During the summer of 2003 Southern California fell siege to wildland fires. The Mountain Fire in southwest Riverside County was the defining incident which brought to the forefront the need for a formal and organized animal rescue program in Riverside County. There were many lessons learned - it was realized that government agencies don't have enough staff to handle a massive animal evacuation; the services of many volunteers were not able to be utilized because they had no formal training and there was no organizational structure; and animal rescue groups must be part of the emergency plan so they don't impede fire engines and emergency vehicles in the course of their work.

Following the aftermath of the Mountain Fire, an ad-hoc committee was formed with representatives from Riverside Counties Sheriff’s Department, Riverside County Department of Animal Services, Riverside County Fire Department (OES) and the California Highway Patrol.

The committee realized the need for an initial training program and continuing training in order to provide for the safety of the volunteers. Initially a basic class was developed consisting of an overview on the areas of Incident Command System, Law Enforcement Issues, Animal Evacuation Procedures, Fire Line Safety and Animal Handling. After completing the Basic Class, volunteers were issued an R.E.A.R.S. identification card. Later in the year continuing training included Flood Training, Trailer Inspection and Maneuvering. To date 279 volunteers have completed the Basic Class!

The original ad-hoc committee has evolved into the R.E.A.R.S. Council that oversees all aspects of the organization. 

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

The R.E.A.R.S. Council oversees all aspects of the organization. The council includes a council chairman and council assistant. The group has been organized into (8) geographical areas identified as Hemet, Mountain, Desert, Banning, Southwest, Elsinore, Riverside and Out of County Areas. To assist the council with communication to the large group of trained volunteers, (23) Area Coordinators have been designated to disseminate information to smaller groups of volunteers.

R.E.A.R.S. Council:

  • Riverside County Sheriff’s Department  | Lt. Matthew Aveling: (951) 955-8860
  • Riverside County Dept. of Animal Services  | Robert Miller: (951) 358-7387
  • Riverside County Dept. of Animal Services  | Frank Corvino: (951) 358-7387
  • Riverside County Dept. of Animal Services  | Rita Gutierrez: (951) 358-7387   
  • Riverside County Fire Department – OES  | Fay Glass: (951) 955-4700
  • California Highway Patrol, Temecula  | vacant: (951) 506-2000
  • Riverside County Dept. of Animal Services

MEMBERSHIP & TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

To become a member of REARS, interested parties must first complete a Volunteer Services Application.

Mail application to:

Riverside County Department of Animal Services
6851 Van Buren, Riverside 92509
Attn: REARS COORDINATOR

Members will be notified if space is available for the upcoming New Member Academy.

Applicants must:

  • Be 18 years of age at the time of the Basic Class.
  • Must posses a valid California Drivers License, if expecting to operate a motor vehicle, or a valid California Identification Card
  • Must disclose any criminal convictions on their R.E.A.R.S. Volunteer Application.
    *A criminal conviction does not necessarily disqualify an applicant. However, failure to disclose such conviction will be grounds for disqualification.
  • Must have a contact phone number.
  • Must attend all required training. Members are expected to complete the New Member Academy, including Incident Command System Training, Animal Rescue Techniques, Emergency Scene Vehicle Operations, Wildland Fire Behavior, Water & Flood Operations, Trailering Techniques, and Trailer Safety Inspections. All members must attend (2) required trainings per year. Members will be given advanced notice of (2) or more dates to complete each required training. Additional recommended trainings may be held during the year that will not require participation.
  • Effective immediately, those who do not complete the required trainings for the year, will be placed on the inactive list and not allowed to participate until they complete the next cycle of required training sessions. After completion of the required training, inactive members will be put back on the active list and allowed to participate in evacuations.

To date, 279 volunteers have completed the New Member Academy!

Monday, 17 February 2014 05:07

Volunteer Newsletters

Riverside 2015

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-08 August 3.87 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-07 July 1.26 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-06 June 1.42 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-05 May 1.4 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-04 April 1.65 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-03 March 2.13 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-02 February 5.61 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2015-01 January 5.25 MB

Desert 2012

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-12 - December 3.06 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-10 - October 3.12 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 2012-01 - January 1.61 MB

 

San Jacinto Valley Animal Campus 2015

Filename Size
An Adobe Acrobat file 4th Quarter - Volunteer Voices 4.13 MB
An Adobe Acrobat file 3rd Quarter - Volunteer Voices 1.68 MB

 

Newsletters Archive »

Saturday, 15 February 2014 07:50

Become a Volunteer

rcdas volunteers

Volunteers Needed

We are looking for volunteers to join our Cat Care Team. Help us build our volunteer base and assist at local PetCo stores.

For more information, select your location below:

Beaumont & Hemet Flyer       Indio & La Quinta Flyer

Volunteers give the greatest gift of all.

There are so many great reasons to volunteer. Meet new people, experience the satisfaction of community service, develop new skills, and acquire work experience for future endeavors.

Our volunteers improve the welfare of our shelter animals by walking the dogs, brushing and petting the cats, by giving a dirty doggy a bath, making a kitty a new bed to sleep in, reading to a dog, plus much more.

Steps to becoming a volunteer include:

Fill out the volunteer application for the shelter nearest you. We will contact you via email to set up a mandatory orientation appointment. At the orientation you will be taught the rules, policies, and standard operating procedures to become a volunteer. A livescan (background check) will be done at the orientation, please bring your driver’s license with you. You will also be taught our adoption process and behaviour training for dogs. Once you have passed the livescan you will be notified via email to attend our Welcome Training where you will have hands on animal handling training. Note: please adhere to the dress code.

Also, as a volunteer we ask that you do not opt out of Newsletters, Events, or Recruitment Appeals when filling out your volunteer application. If you do so you will not receive any notifications from our department including upcoming orientation and/or training dates.

APPLICATIONS

1. Fill out the online application by clicking the appropriate link listed below: Please submit by shelter location.

If you would prefer not to use the online form, submit the Application to Become a Volunteer to the shelter in your area by mail or in person.


2. We will schedule you for the next orientation and basic training.
3.  Get ready to have fun and enjoy helping the homeless animals.

Blythe: 760-921-7857

CVAC: 760-343-4430

Riverside: 951-358-7973

Donate

For your convenience, we accept payment by Visa and Master Card.  We do not accept American Express or Discover credit cards.  We do not accept credit card numbers over the phone or through the mail.

Donate Now!