Pet Education

Pet Education (6)

Monday, 23 June 2014 13:25

Tips for Pet Owners on Hot Days

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger, ASPCA experts warn.

"Most people love to spend the warmer days enjoying the outdoors with friends and family, but it is important to remember that some activities can be dangerous for our pets," said Dr. Camille DeClementi, Senior Toxicologist at the ASPCA's Animal Poison Control Center. "By following a few simple rules, it is easy to keep your pet safe while still having fun in the sun."

Take these simple precautions, provided by ASPCA experts, to help prevent your pet from overheating. And if you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.

Visit the Vet
A visit to the veterinarian for a spring or early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pets get tested for heartworm if they aren't on year-round preventive medication. Do parasites bug your animal companions? Ask your doctor to recommend a safe flea and tick control program.

Made in the Shade
Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it's hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it's extremely hot.

Know the Warning Signs
Symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.

No Parking!
Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. "On a hot day, a parked car can become a furnace in no time-even with the windows open-which could lead to fatal heat stroke," says Dr. Louise Murray, Vice President of the ASPCA Animal Hospital. Also, leaving pets unattended in cars in extreme weather is illegal in several states.

Make a Safe Splash
Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals that could cause stomach upset.

Screen Test
"During warmer months, the ASPCA sees an increase in injured animals as a result of High-Rise Syndrome, which occurs when pets-mostly cats-fall out of windows or doors and are seriously or fatally injured," says Dr. Murray. "Pet owners need to know that this is completely preventable if they take simple precautions." Keep all unscreened windows or doors in your home closed and make sure adjustable screens are tightly secured.

Summer Style
Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs' coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.

Street Smarts
When the temperature is very high, don't let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close the ground, your pooch's body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.

Avoid Chemicals
Commonly used flea and tick products, rodenticides (mouse and rat baits), and lawn and garden insecticides can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested, so keep them out of reach. When walking your dog, steer clear of areas that you suspect have been sprayed with insecticides or other chemicals. Keep citronella candles, oil products and insect coils out of pets' reach as well. Call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 if you suspect your animal has ingested a poisonous substance.

Party Animals
Taking Fido to a backyard barbeque or party? Remember that the food and drink offered to guests may be poisonous to pets. Keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression and comas. Similarly, remember that the snacks enjoyed by your human friends should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments. Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol.

Fireworks Aren't Very Pet-riotic
Please leave pets at home when you head out to Fourth of July celebrations, and never use fireworks around pets. Exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns or trauma to curious pets, and even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Many types of fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as potassium nitrate, copper, chlorates, arsenic and other heavy metals.

Sunday, 22 June 2014 21:24

Fourth of July Pet Tips


The following information is being provided for July 2nd, 3rd, and 4th 2016

Lost Your Pet During the 4th of July Holiday?

If you have lost your pet, please click here to search our shelters for your lost pet.

Our call center will be closed July 2nd – 4th. After-hour dispatchers are available for emergencies only. Emergency calls should be made for animals that are injured, aggressive, sick and suffering, or obstructing traffic.

Dispatchers do not have access to our database and cannot tell you if your pet has been turned in. You will need to visit our lost pet page or visit our shelters during normal business hours beginning July 5th.

July 5th is our busiest day of the year. If you are looking for a lost pet we encourage you to print and complete this Kennel Visitation Form ( ENGLISH | SPANISH ). This will save you a tremendous amount of time when you arrive. In order to walk through our stray kennels you must be 18 years or older and have a valid form of identification.


The following information is being provided for July 2nd, 3rd, and 4th 2016

Did You Find A Lost Pet During the 4th of July Holiday?

Our call center will be closed July 2nd – 4th. After-hour dispatchers are available for emergencies only. Emergency calls should be made for injured, aggressive, sick and suffering, or animals obstructing traffic.

If you found a stray animal that is not an emergency, the quickest way for you to turn in a found pet is to visit our shelter front counters on July 5th.

An officer can be dispatched to pick up the animal from your home on July 5th, however you will experience a longer wait time as calls are handled in a priority manner. Requests for pick up can be made during normal business hours beginning July 5th 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. by calling 951-358-7387.

When turning in a lost pet you must be 18 years or older and have a valid form of identification.


 

For many people, nothing beats lounging in the backyard on the Fourth of July with good friends and family—including the four-legged members of the household. While it may seem like a great idea to reward Rover with scraps from the grill and bring him along to watch fireworks, in reality some festive foods and products can be potentially hazardous to your pets. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center offers the following tips:

  • Never leave alcoholic drinks unattended where pets can reach them. Alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison pets. If ingested, the animal could become very intoxicated and weak, severely depressed or could go into a coma. Death from respiratory failure is also a possibility in severe cases.
  • Do not apply any sunscreen or insect repellent product to your pet that is not labeled specifically for use on animals. Ingestion of sunscreen products can result in drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy. The misuse of insect repellent that contains DEET can lead to neurological problems.
  • Always keep matches and lighter fluid out of your pets’ reach. Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing—or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. If lighter fluid is inhaled, aspiration pneumonia and breathing problems could develop.
  • Keep your pets on their normal diet. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pets severe indigestion and diarrhea. This is particularly true for older animals who have more delicate digestive systems and nutritional requirements. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals.
  • Do not put glow jewelry on your pets, or allow them to play with it. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.
  • Keep citronella candles, insect coils and oil products out of reach. Ingestions can produce stomach irritation and possibly even central nervous system depression. If inhaled, the oils could cause aspiration pneumonia in pets.
  • Never use fireworks around pets! While exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws of curious pets, even unused fireworks can pose a danger. Many types contain potentially toxic substances, including potassium nitrate, arsenic and other heavy metals.
  • Loud, crowded fireworks displays are no fun for pets, so please resist the urge to take them to Independence Day festivities. Instead, keep your little guys safe from the noise in a quiet, sheltered and escape-proof area at home.
Monday, 17 February 2014 13:12

Dog Training

Please check back for upcoming dog training workshops.

Click here to access our Library for Solving Behavior Problems.

Monday, 17 February 2014 17:55

Shelter Tours

Adult and Youth Group Tours

Guided Tours are available for groups of all sizes and ages. These interactive tours explore the facility providing information about responsible pet care, animal behavior and safety, and what to consider when choosing a pet.

* A $7 donation per person is suggested (made payable to the ASK Foundation)

For information and reservations for a tour, please email Kimberly McWhorter 

Scout Programs

  • Girl Scouts are invited to earn their "Pet Care Badge" in our one-stop program! Also, Scouts can work on their Bronze, Silver and Gold awards with us.
  • Boy Scouts are welcome to join us for all level of scouts.

Groups that complete a service project for the shelter can earn a special Animal Services patch with our logo.

* A $7 donation per child is suggested (made payable to the ASK Foundation)

For information regarding Scout Programs and to make reservations, please email Kimberly McWhorter

(All Scout curriculum has been developed in accordance with current guidebook badge requirements.) 

*Your donations are imperative in helping us to keep our education programs going and aid shelter animals.

AN ORDINANCE OF THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE AUTHORIZING THE SEIZURE, IMPOUNDMENT AND TERMINATION OF OWNERSHIP RIGHTS IN ABANDONED, NEGLECTED, OR CRUELLY TREATED ANIMALS


6.12.010 DISPOSAL ALLOWED WHEN

Any dog, cat or other animal which is abandoned, neglected, sick, lame, feeble, is unfit for the labor it is performing, or that in any manner is being cruelly treated may be impounded and disposed of in a humane manner as hereinafter provided. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 1, 1991)

6.12.020 PROMPT ACTION ALLOWED WHEN -- LIEN FOR CARE AND TREATMENT

Whenever any peace officer or animal control officer has reasonable grounds to believe that very prompt action is required to protect the health or safety of the animal or the health or safety of others, the officer shall immediately seize the animal and comply with the procedure established in Section 6.12.030. In all other cases, the officer shall comply with the provisions of Section 6.12.040. The cost of caring for and treating any animal properly seized under this chapter shall constitute a lien on the animal and the animal shall not be returned to its owner until the charges are paid, unless the hearing officer determines that the seizure was unjustified. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 2, 1991)

6.12.030 POST SEIZURE HEARING

Whenever an animal control officer or peace officer seizes or impounds an animal based on a reasonable belief that prompt action is required to protect the health or safety of the animal or the health or safety of others, the officer shall, prior to the commencement of any criminal proceedings provide the owner or keeper of the animal, if known or ascertained after reasonable investigation, with the opportunity for a post seizure hearing as hereinafter provided to determine the validity of the seizure or impoundment, or both.

A. The health department shall cause a notice to be affixed to a conspicuous place where the animal was situated or personally deliver a notice of the seizure or impoundment, or both, to the owner or keeper within 48 hours, excluding weekends and holidays. The notice shall include all of the following:

1. The name, business address, and telephone number of the officer providing the notice;

2. A description of the animal seized, including any identification upon the animal;

3. The authority and purpose for the seizure, or impoundment, including the time, place and circumstances under which the animal was seized;

4. A statement that, in order to receive a post seizure hearing, the owner or person authorized to keep the animal, or his or her agent, shall request the hearing by signing and returning an enclosed declaration of ownership or right to keep the animal to the health department within ten (10) days, including weekends and holidays, of the date of the notice. The declaration may be returned by personal delivery or mail;

5. A statement that the cost of caring for and treating any animal properly seized under this section is a lien on the animal and that the animal shall not be returned to the owner until the charges are paid, and that failure to request or to attend a scheduled hearing shall result in liability for this cost.

B. The post seizure hearing shall be conducted within forty-eight (48) hours of the request, excluding weekends and holidays. The hearing shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of Section 6.12.080.

C. Failure of the owner or keeper, or of his or her agent, to request a hearing within the prescribed time period, or to attend a scheduled hearing, shall result in forfeiture of any right to a post seizure hearing or right to challenge his or her liability for costs incurred.

D. The health department, or law enforcement agency that directed the seizure shall be responsible for the costs incurred for caring and treating the animal, if it is determined in the post seizure hearing that the seizing officer did not have reasonable grounds to believe very prompt action, including seizure of the animal, was required to protect the health or safety of the animal or the health or safety of others. If it is determined the seizure was justified, the owner or keeper shall be personally liable to the seizing agency for the cost of the seizure and care of the animal, and the animal shall not be returned to its owner until the charges are paid and the seizing agency or hearing officer has determined that the animal is physically fit or the owner demonstrates to the seizing agency’s or the hearing officer’s satisfaction that the owner can and will provide the necessary care. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 3, 1991)

6.12.040 HEARING PRIOR TO SEIZURE OF ANIMAL

Where the need for immediate seizure is not present and prior to the commencement of any criminal proceedings the health officer shall provide the owner or keeper of the animals, if known or ascertainable after reasonable investigation, with the opportunity for a hearing prior to any seizure or impoundment of the animal. The owner shall produce the animal at the time of the hearing unless, prior to the hearing, the owner has made arrangements with the agency to view the animal upon request of the agency, or unless the owner can provide verification that the animal was humanely destroyed. Any person who wilfully fails to produce the animal or provide the verification is guilty of an infraction, punishable by a fine of not less than two hundred and fifty dollars ($250.00) no more than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).

A. The health department or law enforcement agency shall cause a notice to be affixed to a conspicuous place where the animal was situated or personally deliver a notice stating the grounds for believing the animal should be seized. The notice shall include all of the following:

1. The name, business address, and telephone number of the officer providing the notice;

2. A description of the animal to be seized, including any identification upon the animal;

3. The authority and purpose for the possible seizure or impoundment;

4. A statement that, in order to receive a hearing prior to any seizure, the owner or person authorized to keep the animal, or his or her agent, shall request the hearing by signing and returning the enclosed declaration of ownership or right to keep animal to the officer providing the notice within two days, excluding weekends and holidays, of the date of the notice;

5. A statement that the cost of caring for and treating any animal properly seized is a lien on the animal, that any animal seized shall not be returned to the owner until the charges are paid, and that failure to request a hearing within the prescribed time period, or to attend a scheduled hearing shall result in a conclusive determination that the animal may properly be seized and that the owner shall be liable for the charges.

B. The preseizure hearing shall be conducted within forty-eight (48) hours, excluding weekends and holidays, after receipt of this request. The hearing shall be conducted in accordance with the procedure established in Section 6.12.080.

C. Failure of the owner or keeper, or his or her agent, to request a hearing within the prescribed time, period or to attend a scheduled hearing, shall result in a forfeiture of any right to a preseizure hearing or right to challenge his or her liability for costs incurred pursuant to this chapter. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 4, 1991)

6.12.050 COST OF SEIZURE AND CARE -- OWNER LIABLE


If any animal is properly seized under this chapter, the owner or keeper shall be personally liable to the seizing agency for the cost of the seizure and care of the animal. Furthermore, if the charges for the seizure or impoundment and any other charges permitted under this chapter are not paid within fourteen (14) days of the seizure, or, if the owner, within fourteen (14) days of notice of availability of the animal to be returned, fails to pay charges permitted under this chapter and take possession of the animal, the animal shall be deemed to have been abandoned and may be disposed of by the impounding officer. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 5, 1991)

6.12.060 NONCOMPLIANCE WITH ORDER TO PROVIDE VETERINARY CARE

If the animal requires veterinary care and the seizing agency is not assured, within fourteen (14) days of the seizure of the animal, that the owner will provide the necessary care, the animal shall not be returned to its owner and shall be deemed to have been abandoned and may be disposed of by the impounding officer. A veterinarian may humanely destroy an impounded animal without regard to the prescribed holding period when it has been determined that the animal has incurred severe injuries or is incurably ill or crippled. A veterinarian also may immediately humanely destroy an impounded animal afflicted with a serious contagious disease unless the owner or his or her agent immediately authorizes treatment of the animal by a veterinarian at the expense of the owner or agent. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 6, 1991)

6.12.070 RETURN TO OWNER -- CONDITIONS

No animal properly seized under this chapter shall be returned to its owner until, in the determination of the seizing agency or hearing officer, the animal is physically fit or the owner can demonstrate to the seizing agency’s or hearing officer’s satisfaction that the owner can and will provide the necessary care. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 7, 1991)

6.12.080 HEARINGS

All hearings conducted pursuant to this chapter shall be conducted by the health officer or his or her designee (hearing officer), who shall not have been directly involved in the subject action and shall not be subordinate in rank to the person seizing or impounding the animal. Hearings shall be conducted in the following manner:

A. The hearing officer may continue the hearing for a reasonable period of time, if the hearing officer deems such continuance to be necessary and proper or if the owner or custodian shows good cause for such continuance.

B. The health department shall have the burden of proof to establish, by a preponderance of evidence, the existence of the condition or conditions which give rise to the need for the seizure or impoundment.

C. In a case where the department is also seeking to terminate the owner’s rights in the animal, the department shall have put the owner or keeper of the animal on due written notice thereof and shall establish the existence of the owner’s or keeper’s acts or omissions resulting in cruelty or neglect to the animal by clear and convincing evidence to a reasonable certainty.

D. The department shall present its case first, followed by the party against whom the seizure or impoundment is being proposed. The department may present rebuttal in the discretion of the hearing officer.

E. Oral evidence shall be taken only on oath or affirmation.

F. Each party shall have the right to call and examine witnesses, to introduce exhibits, to cross-examine opposing witnesses on any other matter relevant to the issues even though that matter was not covered in the direct examination, to impeach any witness regardless of which party first called the witness, and to rebut evidence.

G. The hearing need not be conducted according to technical rules relating to evidence and witnesses. Any relevant evidence shall be admitted if it is the sort of evidence on which responsible persons are accustomed to rely in the conduct of serious affairs, regardless of the existence of any common law or statutory rule which might make improper the admission of such evidence over objection in civil actions. Hearsay evidence may be used for the purpose of supplementing or explaining other evidence, but shall not be sufficient in itself to support a finding unless it would be admissible over objection in civil actions. The rules of privilege shall be effective to the extent that they are otherwise required by statute to be recognized in the hearing. Irrelevant and unduly repetitious evidence shall be excluded.

H. At the conclusion of the hearing, each side shall be given an opportunity to summarize its position.

I. Within three working days after the conclusion of the hearing, the hearing officer shall render, in writing, his or her findings, decision and order thereon, and shall give notice, in writing, of the findings, decision and order to the owner or custodian of the animal.

J. In the event a sufficient quantum of evidence presented at the hearing supports a determination for seizure, impoundment and/or termination of the owner’s rights in the animal, the hearing officer as a part of his decision may order, but is not limited to ordering, that one or more of the following actions be undertaken:

1. That the owner’s and/or custodian’s rights in the dog, cat or other animal are terminated;

2. That the owner or custodian of the dog, cat or other animal shall remove the animal(s) from the premises by a specified date;

3. That the health department personnel after a specified date, shall impound the animal or animals;

4. That the health department shall sell, give away, or otherwise dispose of, the animal(s) with the owner or custodian of the animal(s) being responsible to reimburse the county or agency as designated by the county for all costs and expenses including, but not limited to, board, care, veterinary services, and costs of disposal. If the animal(s) are sold, the proceeds from the sale shall go to the county or agency as designated by the county.

K. A decision upholding seizure or impoundment shall become effective upon issuance.

L. A decision terminating an owner’s rights in the animal shall become effective thirty (30) days from the date the decision is mailed unless a stay of execution is granted. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 8, 1991)

6.12.090 ABANDONED OR STRAY ANIMALS -- AUTHORITY TO REHABILITATE OR DESTROY

Every such, disabled, infirm or crippled animal, except a dog or cat, abandoned in any part of the unincorporated area the county may be immediately killed by the health department or law enforcement agency or their designees if, after a reasonable search, no owner of the animal can be located. It shall be the duty of all peace officers and animal control officers to cause the animal to be killed or rehabilitated and placed in a suitable home on information that the animal is stray or abandoned. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 9, 1991)

6.12.100 TRANSFER TO VETERINARIAN

Any peace officer, humane society officer, or animal control officer shall convey all injured cats and dogs found without their owners in a public place directly to a veterinarian known by the officer to be a veterinarian who ordinarily treats dogs and cats for a determination of whether the animal shall be immediately and humanely destroyed or shall be hospitalized under proper care and given emergency treatment.

If the owner does not redeem the animal within the locally prescribed waiting period, the veterinarian may personally perform euthanasia on the animal. If the animal is treated and recovers from its injuries, the veterinarian may keep the animal for purposes of adoption, provided the responsible animal control agency has first been contacted and has refused to take possession of the animal.

Whenever any animal is transferred to a veterinarian in a clinic, such as an emergency clinic which is not in continuous operation, the veterinarian may, in turn, transfer the animal to an appropriate facility.

If the veterinarian determines that the animal shall be hospitalized under proper care and given emergency treatment, the costs of any services which are provided pending the owner’s inquiry to the responsible agency or department shall be paid from the dog license fees, fines, and fees from impounding dogs in the city, county or city and county in which the animal was licensed or, if the animal is unlicensed, shall be paid by the jurisdiction in which the animal was found, subject to the provision that this cost be repaid by the animal’s owner. The cost of caring for and treating any animal seized under this section shall constitute a lien on the animal and the animal shall not be returned to the owner until the charges are paid. No veterinarian shall be criminally or civilly liable for any decision which he or she makes or for services which he or she provides pursuant to this section.

An animal control agency which takes possession of an animal pursuant to this section shall keep records of the whereabouts of the animal for a seventy-two (72) hour period from the time of possession, and those records shall be available for inspection by the public upon request. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 10, 1991)

6.12.110 HUMANE DESTRUCTION OF ANIMAL IN THE FIELD


Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, any peace officer or any animal control officer may, with the approval of his or her immediate superior, humanely destroy any stray or abandoned animal in the field in any case where the animal is too severely injured to move or where a veterinarian is not available and it would be more humane to dispose of the animal. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 11, 1991)

6.12.120 VIOLATION--PENALTY

Every owner, driver or keeper of any animal who permits the animal to be in any building, enclosure, lane, street, square or lot within the unincorporated area of Riverside County, without proper care or attention shall be guilty of an infraction or misdemeanor as hereinafter specified. Such individual shall be deemed guilty of a separate offense of each and every day or portion thereof during which any violation of any of the provisions of this chapter is committed, continued or permitted. Any individual convicted of a violation of this chapter shall be: (1) guilty of an infraction offense and punished by a fine not exceeding one hundred dollars ($100.00) for a first violation; (2) guilty of an infraction offense and punished by a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars ($200.00) for a second violation. The third and any additional violations shall constitute a misdemeanor offense and shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) or six months in jail, or both. Notwithstanding the above, a first offense may be charged and prosecuted as a misdemeanor. Payment of any penalty herein shall not relieve an individual from the responsibility for correcting the violation. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 12, 1991)

6.12.130 VIOLATION--ANIMAL(S) TO BE FORFEITED

Upon the conviction of a person charged with a violation of this chapter, all animals lawfully seized and impounded with respect to the violation shall be adjudged by the court to be forfeited and shall thereupon be transferred to the impounding officer for proper disposition. A person convicted of a violation of this chapter shall be personally liable to the seizing agency for all costs of impoundment from the time of seizure to the time of proper disposition. This chapter shall not prohibit the seizure or impoundment of animals as evidence as provided for under any other provision of law. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 13, 1991)

6.12.140 CHAPTER PROVISIONS NOT EXCLUSIVE

This chapter is not intended, nor shall it be construed in any way, to affect Sections 31101 or 31752 of the Food and Agriculture Code. (Ord. 716.1 § 2 (part), 2000; Ord. 716 § 14, 1991)
Monday, 17 February 2014 07:45

Animal Cruelty, Abuse & Neglect

If you suspect animal cruelty, abuse or neglect are taking place, please call Riverside County Animal Services at (951) 358-7387. Anonymous reports are accepted and an animal control officer will be sent to investigate the claim.

Cruelty Cases

Animal Services responds to complaints and conducts investigations on possible animal cruelty and provides educational information about proper care for animals. If the cruelty complaint is founded, a thorough investigation is conducted, including, but not limited to, the removal of animals and prosecution under the full extent of the law.

Ordinance

How Animal Abuse May Indicate Other Deviant Behavior

According to leading mental health professionals and law-enforcement agencies, perpetrators of violent acts against animals are often repeat offenders who pose a serious threat not only to other animals, but to the community as a whole.

The American Psychiatric Association identifies cruelty to animals as one of the diagnostic criteria for conduct disorders, and the FBI uses reports of animal abuse in analyzing the threat potential of suspected and known criminals. Experts agree that it is the severity of the behavior—not the species of the victim.

“Children who abuse animals are more likely to commit crimes as adults, but there are many factors that play into why children abuse animals, these can include witnessing violence or abuse in the home or community where the animal becomes a scapegoat for what the child is feeling”, said Steve Steinberg Mental Health Services Manager for the County of Riverside. “Peer pressure and consequences of not acting along with the group can lead to ridicule or non acceptance among their peers”, added Steinberg.

FBI interviews with murderers showed that 36 percent had tortured and killed animals as children and that 46 percent had done so as adolescents. In recent years, many schools have suffered the tragic consequences of cruelty to animals that was ignored or casually dismissed. Mississippi’s Luke Woodham, 16; Kentucky’s Michael Carneal, 14; Arkansas’ Mitchell Johnson, 13, and Andrew Golden, 11; Oregon’s Kip Kinkel, 15; Georgia’s Thomas "TJ" Solomon Jr., 15; and Colorado’s Dylan Klebold, 17, and Eric Harris, 17, who perpetrated killing sprees in their schools, all had histories of killing animals, as did serial killers Jeffrey Dahmer, Albert DeSalvo (the "Boston Strangler"), David Berkowitz (the "Son of Sam"), Russell Weston, and Lee Boyd Malvo.

“With violence in schools escalating and the concrete link between cruelty to animals and violence toward humans, animal abuse needs to be taken very seriously”, said Rita Gutierrez, Commander of Field Services of the Riverside County Department of Animal Services. “This type of behavior cannot go unchecked because it is an indicator of things to come”, said Gutierrez.

The Riverside County Department of Animal Services urges the community to report any incidents of animal abuse. For additional information on how you can report animal abuse, please call 951-358-7387 or send Email.

 

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